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INTJ FTW

by Christa on September 10, 2013

in Daily Digest,Just for Fun

Thanks to Whitney and Blogtember, I was inspired to write a post about the Myers-Briggs personality test. Has anyone ever taken this?

You can take it here. I know I’ve mentioned this before (specifically in this post) but each time I take it (the last time I took a real one that was administered was for a leadership program at work), it unfailingly tells me that I am an INTJ… Introvert, iNtuitive, Thinking, Judging.  Full description here.

INTJ1

Introvert? Introvert?!!! I know what you’re thinking. I seem to be pretty outgoing and really social. But that doesn’t make me an extravert. Extraverts recharge by being around people; while one can be (like me) an extraverted introvert, these types still need alone time with their own thoughts to recharge. Our leadership instructor put it pretty well – the extraverted introvert will stay til the end of the party, but he/she won’t go out for pancakes afterward. The extraverts will ALWAYS go out for pancakes.

“The INTJ personality type is one of the rarest and most interesting types – comprising only about 2% of the U.S. population (INTJ females are especially rare – just 0.8%), INTJs are often seen as highly intelligent and perplexingly mysterious. INTJ personalities radiate self-confidence, relying on their huge archive of knowledge spanning many different topics and areas. INTJs usually begin to develop that knowledge in early childhood (the “bookworm” nickname is quite common among INTJs) and keep on doing that later on in life.”

The more I read about being an INTJ, the more my personal hangups and quirks make perfect sense. For instance:

“To outsiders, INTJs may appear to project an aura of “definiteness,”  of self-confidence. This self-confidence, sometimes mistaken for simple arrogance by the less decisive, is actually of a very specific rather than a general nature; its source lies in the specialized knowledge systems that most INTJs start building at an early age. When it comes to their own areas of expertise — and INTJs can have several — they will be able to tell you almost immediately whether or not they can help you, and if so, how. INTJs know what they know, and perhaps still more importantly, they know what they don’t know.

INTJ3

INTJs are perfectionists, with a seemingly endless capacity for improving upon anything that takes their interest. What prevents them from becoming chronically bogged down in this pursuit of perfection is the pragmatism so characteristic of the type: INTJs apply (often ruthlessly) the criterion “Does it work?” to everything from their own research efforts to the prevailing social norms. This in turn produces an unusual independence of mind, freeing the INTJ from the constraints of authority, convention, or sentiment for its own sake.”

Um, yes. I have consistently had trouble in the past with other personality types confusing my directness for being rude or unsympathetic, when in fact I consider myself to be quite compassionate – that doesn’t mean I’m touchy-feely. My thoughts are usually ruled by just that – what I THINK rather than what I FEEL (hence the T).

INTJ2

“INTJs are known as the “Systems Builders” of the types, perhaps in part because they possess the unusual trait combination of imagination and reliability. Whatever system an INTJ happens to be working on is for them the equivalent of a moral cause to an INFJ; both perfectionism and disregard for authority may come into play, as INTJs can be unsparing of both themselves and the others on the project. Anyone considered to be “slacking,” including superiors, will lose their respect — and will generally be made aware of this; INTJs have also been known to take it upon themselves to implement critical decisions without consulting their supervisors or co-workers. On the other hand, they do tend to be scrupulous and even-handed about recognizing the individual contributions that have gone into a project, and have a gift for seizing opportunities which others might not even notice.”

Also: I HATE SLACKERS.  And yes that needed to be bolded and italicized.

“Personal relationships, particularly romantic ones, can be the INTJ’s Achilles heel. While they are capable of caring deeply for others (usually a select few), and are willing to spend a great deal of time and effort on a relationship, the knowledge and self-confidence that make them so successful in other areas can suddenly abandon or mislead them in interpersonal situations.
This happens in part because many INTJs do not readily grasp the social rituals; for instance, they tend to have little patience and less understanding of such things as small talk and flirtation (which most types consider half the fun of a relationship). To complicate matters, INTJs are usually extremely private people, and can often be naturally impassive as well, which makes them easy to misread and misunderstand. Perhaps the most fundamental problem, however, is that INTJs really want people to make sense. :-) This sometimes results in a peculiar naivete, paralleling that of many Fs — only instead of expecting inexhaustible affection and empathy from a romantic relationship, the INTJ will expect inexhaustible reasonability and directness.”

Yeah, I know. I’m elusive and expect a lot out of people. I’m sure this comes as a huge shock to many of you. ;)

A few famous INTJs: Lance Armstrong, Katie Couric, Claire Danes, Richard Gere, Peter Jennings, Rudy Giuliani, Michelle Obama, Hilary Clinton, Colin Powell, JFK (jeez, maybe I should be a politician??)

INTJ4

Unstoppable.

WHAT’S YOUR MB personality type? Take a short test here.

And what do you think about the results?

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Whitney September 10, 2013 at 3:57 pm

So glad I could inspire your post! Bill Clinton was the same personality type as me, so I’m pretty proud of that. Would love it even more if it was Hillary :)

Reply

Christa September 11, 2013 at 9:45 am

So that means that Bill and Hillary are total opposites too then – I guess they do attract!

Reply

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